Photos of Paul Wellstone in the Northland

Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012, marks the 10th anniversary of the plane crash near Eveleth that took the life of U.S. Sen. Paul Wellstone (D-Minn.), his wife Sheila, and six others. Read the News Tribune’s coverage of the anniversary here.

Here’s a selection of News Tribune file photos from Wellstone’s many trips to the Northland, leading up to his election to the Senate in 1990 and in the years that followed:

Democrat Paul Wellstone ratchets up his U.S. Senate campaign against incumbent Republican Rudy Boschwitz during a stop at the Duluth Labor Temple on June 9, 1989. (John Rott / News-Tribune)

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Senator-elect Paul Wellstone reacts to the approval of the crowd during a standing-room-only town hall meeting at the Marshall School cafeteria in Duluth on Dec. 5, 1990. (Steve Stearns / News-Tribune)

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As Sen. Paul Wellstone jokes with locals at Maggie’s, a popular restaurant in Nashwauk, on April 5, 1991, owner Margaret Breuling looks on and smiles. (Charles Curtis / News-Tribune)

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Sen. Paul Wellstone greets people who gathered for the opening of his office in Virginia, Minn., on April 5, 1991. (Charles Curtis / News-Tribune)

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Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minn., speaks at a rally at the Duluth Labor Temple on London Road on April 13, 1991. (Dave Ballard / News-Tribune)

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Sen. Paul Wellstone answers questions from the audience during a meeting about health-care issues on Feb. 13, 1992, at Duluth Central High School. (Clara Wu / News-Tribune)

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Sen. Paul Wellstone addresses DFL delegates from across Minnesota on June 5, 1992, the first day of the state DFL convention at the DECC, Interpreting was Kim Olson of Minneapolis. (Bob King / News-Tribune)

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Marilyn Pribyl of Chaska and Terry Selle of Bloomington listen as Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minn., pauses to chat with them during a stop at Grandma’s Restaurant in Duluth on Jan. 15, 1994. (Steve Stearns / News-Tribune)

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Sen. Paul Wellstone addresses a gathering of people in low-income situations during a news conference Nov. 21, 1995, at Emerson School in Duluth. The event was held to bring attention to the plight of low-income people in need of housing assistance. (Dave Ballard / News-Tribune)

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Aimee McIntyre (left) and Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minn., share a laugh during a rally for Wellstone at the Federal Building in Duluth on July 1, 1996. Supporters wore shirts with red targets and the words: “Proud to be a Republican Target.” (Kathy Strauss / News-Tribune)

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Sen. Paul Wellstone speaks to the crowd gathered at a rally at the DECC’s Pioneer Hall in Duluth on the morning of Oct. 23, 1996, as Vice President Al Gore applauds in the background. (Dave Ballard / News-Tribune)

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U.S. Sen. Paul Wellstone answers a question from a student in the audience during the Democracy in Action forum April 9, 1999, at the College of St. Scholastica. More than 600 students from the three high schools in Duluth attended the forum, which gave them an opportunity to challenge and ask questions of elected officals. Listening to Wellstone on stage are state Sen. Sam Solon and Duluth Mayor Gary Doty. (Dave Ballard / News-Tribune)

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Sen. Paul Wellstone speaks to a crowd of about 100 gathered Sunday at the entrance of ME International in Duluth on Oct. 31, 1999. Wellstone voiced his support of the United Steelworkers of America Local 1028 strike that has been in effect since August. (Renee Knoeber / News-Tribune)

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Sen. Paul Wellstone visits Denfeld High School in Duluth on Nov. 16, 2000. (Rick Scibelli / News-Tribune)

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Sen. Paul Wellstone meets with a full auditorium of Denfeld High School students on Nov. 16, 2000, at the school. Wellstone took questions and comments from students regarding the recent election and the issues surrounding it. (Rick Scibelli / News-Tribune)

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U.S. Sen. Paul Wellstone greets members of the Duluth Denfeld singing groups Solid Gold and Steppin’ Up on Nov. 16, 2000, during a visit to the school. Wellstone engaged the students in a town hall-style meeting, discussing the previous week’s presidential election. (Rick Scibelli / News-Tribune)

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Sens. Paul Wellstone and Mark Dayton talk in Superior on March 9, 2001, with employees of Partridge River Inc., the company whose Hoyt Lakes plant was destroyed by fire earlier that month. The meeting took place at Partridge River’s Superior facility. (Charles Curtis / News-Tribune)

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Carl Eller mystery photo

While looking in the News Tribune Attic earlier this week, I found this photo of Minnesota Vikings great Carl Eller holding a camera, flanked by two employees of a store I assume to be in Duluth, sometime in the 1970s.

The caption on the back of the photo identifies them as Paul Goldstein (left), owner, and Mike Newman (right), photographic manager. But it does not name the store, and does not include a specific date that would help me track down an accompanying story with more information.

I’ll keep looking through the files, but in the meantime can anyone out there provide more information about the location, date and context of this picture? If you know more, please post a comment.

DFL convention in Duluth, 1970

June 1970

Here are a couple of photos from the 1970 Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party convention at the Duluth Arena:

State Sen. Nicholas Coleman raises Wendell Anderson’s hand in a victory gesture after Anderson was endorsed for governor by acclamation at the Minnesota DFL convention on June 27, 1970. Looking on at left is senatorial candidate Hubert H. Humphrey, and at right are Sen. Walter F. Mondale and Rep. John A. Blatnik. (Charles Curtis / News-Tribune)

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Minnesota gubernatorial candidate State Sen. Wendell Anderson and his wife (center) stand on the rostrum of the DFL state convention at the Duluth Arena on June 28, 1970, flanked by candidates on the party’s endorse ticket. They are (from left) attorney general candidate Warren Spannaus; lieutenant governor candidate State Sen. and Mrs. R.G. Perpich with their son, Rudy, and daughter, Mary Sue; the Andersons; secretary of state candidate Elmer Childress; state auditor candidate Jon Wefald; and state treasurer candidate H. Leonard Boche. (Earl Johnson / News-Tribune)

Here’s a rundown of how these candidates fared, according to the Minnesota Secretary of State website:

  • Anderson won the Minnesota governor’s race
  • Perpich won the lieutenant governor’s race
  • Spannaus won the attorney general race
  • Childress lost the secretary of state race to Arlen Erdahl
  • Wefald lost the state auditor race to Rolland Hatfield
  • Boche lost the state treasurer race to Val Bjornson. The office no longer exists.
  • Humphrey won election back to the U.S. Senate (he had served there previously from 1949-1964, before becoming vice president from 1965-1969)

Duluth’s Don Ness: player before mayor

As the Minnesota high school basketball season concludes, 2010 also marked the end of Duluth Central and its basketball team with the upcoming closing of the school.

Duluth Central basketball player Don Ness (front) had a quiet moment on the bus next to the state tournament plaque the team received on their trip back to Duluth from St. Paul on March 29, 1992. In the back reading a newspaper was Erik Reinertsen and playing cards were Dave Berntson and Todd Hanson. Clara Wu / Duluth News Tribune

Looking back at Duluth Central basketball, one player on the 1992 Trojan team that went to the state tournament was Don Ness, who later would become mayor of Duluth. Here’s a brief look at that March in 1992, where the Trojans finished with a third-place finish.

Duluth Central’s Don Ness makes a basket against Moorhead in the third-place game at the state tournament at the St. Paul Civic Center. Clara Wu / Duluth News Tribune

Duluth Central players celebrate after a win at the 1992 state boys basketball tournament in St. Paul. Players are (from left) Don Ness, Elisha Sickler, Erik Reinertsen and Bill Irving. Clara Wu / Duluth News Tribune

Dave Nevanen, copy editor

Dominant Broncos: State hockey tourney

International Falls hockey coach Larry Ross and the Broncos during a game in the mid-1960s against Duluth Cathedral in Duluth. News Tribune photo by Charles Curtis

There have obviously been many good teams to play in the Minnesota high school boys hockey tournament, but there were none as dominating as the International Falls Broncos during the 1960s.

The Broncos have won seven state championships overall, with four of those coming in the 1960s. The Falls put up some impressive numbers in accomplishing that feat.

–The Falls had a 59-game winning streak from 1962 to 66.

–The Broncos won three consecutive state titles (64-65-66), and were an overtime loss away from five straight. The Falls beat Roseau for the 1962 title, then lost 4-3 in overtime to St. Paul Johnson in the 1963 title game. The Broncos came back to win the next three state titles, including undefeated seasons (26-0) in 1965 and 1966 under the guidance of coach Larry Ross, who was with the Broncos from 1954-85.

Falls hockey coach Larry Ross, who had a record of 566-169-21 in 31 seasons (1954-85), including six Minnesota state titles. News Tribune photo

One other interesting note about those teams. Before Bronco Arena was built in 1968, the Broncos played their "home games" at Memorial Arena in neighboring Fort Frances, Ontario.

Many argue the undefeated 1965 Falls team with players like Tim Sheehy and Pete Fichuk was among the best in Minnesota boys hockey history. I tend to agree, but I may be a little biased being from the Falls. Agree or disagree, I’d like to hear who you think was the best prep hockey team in Minnesota history.

–Dave Nevanen, copy editor

Kevin McHale

Hibbing native Kevin McHale played basketball at all levels, including the University of Minnesota and in the NBA with the Boston Celtics during the 1980s and early 1990s. He later became a front office member of the Minnesota Timberwolves, including a stint as coach. Here are some notable encounters for McHale.

Dave Nevanen/copy editor

Bob Zbasnik tries to guard Kevin McHale. 1978 / Duluth News Tribune

Bill Walton (left) makes a point to Kevin McHale when the Celtics were playing in the NBA Championship in 1986. Associated Press

Kevin McHale collars Kurt Rambis of the Lakers during the 1984 NBA playoffs. Ironically, Rambis replaced McHale as coach of the Minnesota Timberwolves in 2009. Associated Press

Detroit Pistons’ Dennis Rodman (center) reels backward after Kevin McHale (left) of the Celtics hit him in the neck in 1991. Looking on is Larry Bird. Associated Press

Kevin McHale (right) made a cameo appearance on the NBC comedy "Cheers" in 1990. Bartender Sam Malone (Ted Danson, left) tried to convince McHale of the Celtics to play for Cheers in a basketball game against a rival tavern. Photo by NBC

Vikings and Super Bowls

 

Minnesota Vikings quarterback Fran Tarkenton sits on his helmet during the final minutes of the Super Bowl in 1977, a 32-14 loss to the Oakland Raiders in Pasadena, Calif. Associated Press

The Minnesota Vikings came painfully close to making it to their fifth Super Bowl, but many fans are still hurting after the overtime loss to New Orleans on Jan. 24, 2010. The Vikings are 0-4 in Super Bowls and sometimes digging through the attic, you find a treasure. I discovered a photo involving what I have heard as the "Whiskey Bottle Curse", where referee Armen Terzian was hit by a whiskey bottle by Vikings fans during a 1975 NFC playoff loss  against the Dallas Cowboys at Metropolitan Stadium. Some say the curse is why the Vikings have failed to win in big playoff games.

There are other photos that connect the Vikings to the Super Bowl or playoffs from the past. I hope they don’t stir up too many bad memories.

Dave Nevanen, copy editor

Chuck Foreman (44) of the Minnesota Vikings pleads with fans as official Armen Terzian lays on the field after being struck by a whiskey bottle thrown from the stands during a 1975 playoff game against the Dallas Cowboys at Metropolitan Stadium in Bloomington, Minn. Charles Curtis / News Tribune

Carl Eller (81) of the Vikings chasing quarterback Archie Manning of the New Orleans Saints during a game in 1976. Super Bowl connection: Archie Manning’s son Peyton Manning is the quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts, who are playing the New Orleans Saints in the Super Bowl. And we all know who the Saints beat in this year’s NFC Championship. News Tribune


Quarterback Fran Tarkenton (10) of the Vikings in a 1976 playoff game against Washington at Met Stadium. News Tribune

Minnesota coach Bud Grant runs from the field after the Vikings lost to the Miami Dolphins in the 1974 Super Bowl in Houston. Associated Press

Remembering Bronko Nagurski

Twenty years ago in early January, legendary football player Bronko Nagurski died in International Falls at the age of 81. Nagurski, was an All-American at two positions, defensive tackle and fullback while at the University of Minnesota in the 1920s. The 6-foot, 225-pound hard-hitting Nagurski played in the NFL for the Chicago Bears from 1930-1943. After football, he wrestled professionally until he retired from sports and returned to his hometown of International Falls where he operated a service station until 1968.

Born Bronislau Nagurski to Ukrainian parents, Bronko is a charter member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame and is in many Hall of Fames, including the Duluth Arena Sports Hall of Fame.

He was successful in many things, including the story about his gas station in downtown International Falls.

A visitor to the Canadian border town asked whether or not he was a successful gas station owner.

"Once someone gets gas from Bronko, they never go anyplace else," a local told him.

"Is the service good?" asked the visitor.

"No, not really," said the local.

"Does he have the best price?"

"Actually he is about three cents more expensive than everybody else in town."

"Then the gas must be better."

"No, it’s just the regular gas from Standard Oil."

"Then why does everyone keep coming back to Bronko?"

"Because when Bronko Nagurski puts your gas cap on, no one but Bronko Nagurski can get it back off."