Wade Stadium, circa 1950

circa 1950

This uncaptioned photo shows Duluth’s Wade Stadium, probably about 1950; it opened in 1941 (history here). It was the home of the Dukes for many years, and now hosts the Duluth Huskies baseball team.

Here is a zoomed-in view of the ads on the outfield wall:

From left, they read:

- Make a hit! Start a savings account at Northern Minnesota National Bank, FDIC insured, Alworth Building

- See Capehart Television, xxxx & xxxx Stores (illegible store names), 2001 W. Superior St. / Hit the TV picture and win a Capehart

- xxxxx (illegible text), The Big Duluth, West Superior Street

- Coca-Cola

- (above the scoreboard) Old Thompson Triple A Blend (whisky)

The Capehart ad is what leads me to the guess of 1950 for the date of this photo; apparently Capehart TVs were manufactured by the Capehart-Farnsworth Co. of Fort Wayne, Indiana, from the late 1940s into the 1960s.

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Visible in the background of the photo is a little neighborhood that must have wiped out when Interstate 35 was pushed through:

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And, also visible in the background, a little railroad trestle that still exists – the one on the left in this zoomed-in view. Today, Jenswold Street crosses underneath (I’ve always wondered about poor, forgotten Jenswold Street – it’s about a block long, and has no homes or businesses on it. It’s just a place-holder between segments of Superior and Michigan streets):

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Here is one more view (and a zoomed-in version right below) of the Wade Stadium area, with Wheeler Field and Grand Avenue, too, from August 15, 1974:

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11 thoughts on “Wade Stadium, circa 1950

  1. Remember seeing Hank and Tommy Aaron there when both played for The Eau Claire, but at different times. Denny McClain played for the Dukes, and I saw him at the All-star game. He had won about 20 games by that All-star game. The place was packed for that game, with fans on the field behind temporary fences. The Tigers brought Denny up right after that game.

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  4. Hank Aaron played his first major league game for the Eau Claire Braves at Wade stadium in the 50′s. He arrived and was inserted late in the game, as an 18 year-old shortstop. His first at-bat was a double to left center. I remember the public address announcer remark–”this kid has a future!”..he was right.

  5. I grew up at 38th and Grand and attended many Duke’s games in the late 1950′s and early 1960′s.
    It was quite a place. I also remember many of the
    neighborhoods wiped out by I-35. Also, many streets, such as Helm which was under the ore docks.

  6. I lived at 38th ave and 2nd st close to Wade and took in several games when I was about 8yrs old.
    Looking at the picture of Wade I see in the background what used to be the old Hanna coal dock
    where my dad worked for something like 25 or more years. Sure brings back a lot of memories.

  7. I did an archive search that turned up an article from 1998 on two neighborhoods wiped out by I-35… perhaps its the one you remember. I’ll post it in the next week or so.

  8. I remember that the DNT ran a whole special section about the neighborhoods that were wiped out for I-35. I think this was about 5 years ago. They used on old phonebook from the 60′s or 70′s to track down former residents. It was pretty neat seeing all those pictures from way back in the day — certainly before my time as I’m only 29.

    Andrew — that might be a good theme to use for a while, “Neighborhoods that have disappeared.” (or something like that)

  9. I grew up on 45th and Oneota Street; close to Wade Stadium, and an entire neighborhood wiped out due to the I35 project. But I remember Wade Stadium very well. Neighbors used to walk up there to see games, though the only one I remember is donkey baseball back in the 50s.
    The Big Duluth store was a men’s clothing store that was around for many years. Later it became Livingston’s Big Duluth, and after that, just Livingston’s. (If memory serves. And it often does not!)

  10. Wade Stadium has wonderful memories for me. My dad took me to Duluth Dukes games there in the 40′s. I never cared much for the baseball game, but enjoyed being with my father, watching the fans and eating the hot dogs! The Attic is one of my favourite sites and,now as an expatriate, I thoroughly enjoy reminiscing as I look at photos from my Duluth childhood and teen years in the 30′s and 40′s. Thank you!

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